Caterpillars’ Self-Defence Mimicry and Camouflage

Caterpillars' Self-Defence Mimicry and Camouflage

Caterpillar swallowtail butterfly , family sailboat, has a pair of huge false “eye”, giving it a very menacing look. Therefore, predators, attacking a caterpillar, it is necessary to think several times before her dinner…

Caterpillars' Self-Defence Mimicry and Camouflage

If you are an easy prey for most predators, the transformation into a snake will be a good opportunity to extend its life. Such protection method demonstrates Caterpillar Wine hawk . The head of the snake in the photo is actually a tail caterpillar.

Caterpillars' Self-Defence Mimicry and Camouflage

Green immature “berry” on the photo – the front part of the tracks of one of the species of moths . Its immature kind of holding back the hungry birds.

Caterpillars' Self-Defence Mimicry and Camouflage

This caterpillar moths Megalopygidae family fluffy fur covered, may seem quite harmless. However, her hair covered with a real burning venom that causes pain and inflammation.

Caterpillars' Self-Defence Mimicry and Camouflage Caterpillars' Self-Defence Mimicry and Camouflage

The bright color of the butterfly caterpillars Family Limacodidae serves as a warning to predators who want to eat it. caterpillar body is covered with protective hairs, which are a kind of stings, painful pierce the offenders.

Caterpillars' Self-Defence Mimicry and Camouflage

Sabine (Cerura vinula) are bright defensive behavior. When someone violates its peace, it takes defensive stance, raising his head and pushing the flagella on the tail. In case of neglect to forward warning maneuvers caterpillar floats heavy weapons, releasing a trickle in the attacking formic acid.

Caterpillars' Self-Defence Mimicry and Camouflage

Fluffy caterpillar moths of the family Lymantriinae interesting because its life cycle can last up to 14 years. This establishment is perfectly adapted to living in a cold climate of the Arctic Circle, Greenland and Canada, maintaining very low temperatures down to -70 degrees Celsius.

Caterpillars' Self-Defence Mimicry and Camouflage

Thick hairs covering the body of caterpillars Saturniidae or Saturn , have unpleasant property to burn.

Caterpillars' Self-Defence Mimicry and Camouflage

This extraordinary caterpillar moths family Sibine stimulea has at both ends of the trunk a pair of fleshy appendages, equipped with a variety of venomous spines. Thorns pricked can fail for a few days after an injection can cause nausea in addition to pain, swelling and rashes.

Caterpillars' Self-Defence Mimicry and Camouflage

The Limacodidae or Euclidae are a family of moths in the superfamily Zygaenoidea or the Cossoidea. The caterpillars of these butterflies resemble slugs with eight pairs of suction cups instead of abdominal legs. Bristles on the body of caterpillars cause skin irritation.

Caterpillars' Self-Defence Mimicry and Camouflage Caterpillars' Self-Defence Mimicry and Camouflage

Caterpillars of butterflies family Riodinidae successfully masquerades as a shock of white hair and downy seeds resemble dandelions.

Caterpillars' Self-Defence Mimicry and Camouflage

Another snake or tropical fish? Not that and not the other. Before us caterpillar butterfly Papilio Palamedes , Swallowtail family .

Caterpillars' Self-Defence Mimicry and Camouflage

Moth caterpillar Limacodidae family covered with protective hairs and stinging spines that can cause painful skin reactions.

Caterpillars' Self-Defence Mimicry and Camouflage

Hyalophora Cecropia – the largest moth in North America. The caterpillars of these butterflies are brightly colored body protrusions coated with black studs. Currently, reliably known role of these entities, but it is assumed that this kind of mimicry – likening the poisonous plant.

Caterpillars' Self-Defence Mimicry and Camouflage

Deilephila elpenor . The caterpillar of this moth has a large two pairs of frightening “eye” in the upper part of the body, scares off potential predators.

Caterpillars' Self-Defence Mimicry and Camouflage

The original appearance of the caterpillar Sphingidae subfamily Sphinxes does not have to familiarity.

Caterpillars' Self-Defence Mimicry and Camouflage

Zebra longwing butterfly caterpillar (Heliconius charitonius) are covered with dense hairs sharp, but they do not pose a risk to predators. These caterpillars feed on passionflower (Passiflora), contain toxins, which gives them an unpleasant taste and smell, repelling predators.

Caterpillars' Self-Defence Mimicry and Camouflage Giant swallowtail butterfly caterpillar (Papilio cresphontes) with scent horns extended. Larvae surprisingly resembles bird droppings, which makes it completely invisible to birds of prey. Furthermore, disturbed caterpillar throws out a forked iron, emitting a very unpleasant smell deterrent predators.